PANDEMICS AND CHANGES

I was thinking earlier today about the changes we’ve seen resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.  We’ve had to learn new words and phrases like “new normal”, “social distancing”, “stay-at-home”, “safer at home” …  We’ve had to learn new ways to live and new habits like never leave home without your face-mask and gloves, stand on the “X” in the check-out line, have food delivered or pick it up and take it home.  It’s all about avoiding people instead of socializing and being close to people.  I’ve never seen anything like it in my lifetime, but throughout history there have been other horrible pandemics that the human race has somehow managed to survive.  Three in my lifetime are: 1) 1957 Asian flu which had a second round in 1958 that killed an estimated 1.1 million people worldwide; 2) 1981 HIV/AIDS Believed to have developed from a chimpanzee virus in West Africa in the 1920s the disease moved to Haiti in the 1960s then to New York and San Francisco in the 1970s.  Treatments have been developed to slow the progress but no cure, resulting in 35 million deaths worldwide.  3) 2003 SARS Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome believed to have started in bats and spread to cats and dogs then to humans in China and 26 other countries resulting in 774 deaths.  (Source: history.com).  These and earlier pandemics have altered life in some ways.  Bubonic plague, smallpox, several outbreaks of influenza have brought significant changes in the medical world for vaccines and treatments of the diseases.  I’m sure this one will do the same.

But I wonder about the long-term social aspects of the disease when the worst is over.  Will we still be “social-distancing”, wearing face-masks and gloves?  Since we’ve been in St. Pete now for more than a week Robin and I have not touched or hugged our daughter and son-in-law; we knew when we came that we would have to stop at gas stations, rest areas, restaurants and even though we were masked and gloved anytime we were out of the car we all agreed that the safest thing to do would be “quarantine” for two weeks after arriving here.  For the safety of our family and our new granddaughter it was the right thing to do.  We have visited on their patio always staying a safe distance away.  But it’s hard; I want to hug my children and grandchildren and my Mama and Daddy.

I hope a vaccine can be developed sooner rather than later; some things are just too precious to give up completely forever.

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